Posted in body image for women, current events

Screams Loudly at Hollow Wimps

The man they vote for

sloshes his words like

a lushy wimp who enjoys his beer.

The dull continuation of another lumpy privileged protagonist whose time has expired,

whose salty tears no longer contain any seed of rehabilitation;

empty as the impotent reflection of Narcissus’ dried up well.

Get those rusty coat hangers, boys.
You’ll need them to protect yourselves from
the ghosts of unwanted babies crying in your nightmares.

They scream more loudly than orphans ripped from their parents

and placed in privately funded cages.

They scream more loudly than your fear
of dark-skinned rebels lurking in the
basement
of your souls.

Posted in death and dying, memoir, Writing for healing

They Don’t Tell You

in the background the usual
misogyny
rattles around like the crusty rickety
and impetuous
drunk hanging out at the corner bar bragging to his seaside pals.

mama had warned you about stranger danger
but forgot the part
where your own sister
won’t call you to report
that Linda May had passed away
a month ago.

they don’t tell you
and never did speak
directly
except when the iron was hot
and the blue cold ribbon of one-upping
was theirs to display
and cheer.

Posted in current events

Indictments!

So, we are not insane, it’s the House Republicans and their bedmates,

mental bugs, winning parasites

funded by the enemy

in a tortured game of kidnapping children

incited by gluttonous mouths unable to

fill their bloated, cash-gorged stomachs–

funded  by taxpayer reality tv

and we’re told that a murderous bare-chested rider is the easiest one

according to a bottom-feeding tyrannical clown.

We are not insane.

We see.

 

Posted in Uncategorized

Murmurs

The air in the room felt

as if someone had recently rushed off

and left particles of tiny colors.

Was it excitement or the staggering buzz of

a lover’s quarrel?

***************************************************

And it helps if you fkng know how to spell “murmurs.”  I crack myself up. I changed it. But, in light of the weird crap that’s going on, I forgive myself.

 

Posted in inspirational, memoir, stream of consciousness writing

Surroundings

 

 

 

On walls

through windows

within the molecules of mental constructs

my vocabulary is

delicious, tormented, peaceful, moody, changing and constant,

dreadful

boring

predictable.

I pack a suitcase and fly to Michigan

to see my oldest living relative on my mother’s side who,

at 97, gives me a gift of conversation;

she

tells me again

how my mother was one of the nicest people she’d ever met.

Then later mentions that she wasn’t such a good cook

and that smoking almost killed her.

I can only feel conflicted

but this time

in my mid-60’s mind, it’s all ok now

really, truly

something is healed.

When I am alone on adventure

the muses never fail to inspire

so when I see

the river rushing, winding,

threatening to overflow…

just like my view of life

motivated by surroundings,

the rapid water is a

savior of sorts,

like a psalm or a poem, words to remember.

 

Journal prompt: write about what motivates you. In your journal, add descriptions of who, how, what, where, when…and why.

 

Posted in inspirational, poetry

Whisper

In the dream
the ancestors showed me
the scene.
An owl looking west
perched above
in the woods.
There’s more, the dream is bold.

A whispered tale
for
me
only, in my solace, in the turning darkness,

my usual forays in hallways and destinations

trying to find my room

then the scene

changes reflecting internal visions.

You will know.
Your guide is near.

This time you waited outside.

Posted in current events, satire, stream of consciousness writing

Dribbles and Momentos

I’m writing stream of consciousness to keep my blogging energy alive.

This Friday the 13th has been windy, eerie, howling and haunting, like the song “Ill Wind.”  I can’t stop thinking about Syria and the horrors of war juxtaposed to the constant dribble (or should I say drip, drip, drip) of some asinine details of the US president’s sex life. People are salivating in anticipation of former FBI director Comey’s book, one I would re-title  A Higher “Royalty,” pun intended. But hey, freedom of the press and freedom of profits and all that. Who am I to judge? I’m just a lowly home-maker/artist/scribbler gone wild.

Mad housewife pitch: Bully politician fires tall FBI career guy who doesn’t protect efficient career woman on verge of becoming first female president after being proven innocent of scandal. Career guy dishes dirt on politician.

So this new memoir promises to divulge juicy facts that we’re tired of but can’t turn away from, after inundation with compassion fatigue for everything. High school students, staff, and families with PTSD from school shootings, unarmed black youth shot to death on camera at the rate of dozens per week or something like it. Food stamps cut. Elderly in assisted living rents raised $150 per month. Teachers on strike, that sort of thing.

Yet, back to the memoir: many of us still shaking our heads about why Comey seems to sabotage Hillary Clinton right before the election. It looks like men just can’t stand to think that women are capable of leading. They are so insecure about their manhood. Or their lack of melanin? What is it? That’s about to change, fellas. What has really happened is that when you mess up, we take over. Nothing personal, but have you forgotten Mother Nature always bats last? Or has the last word? Or, hell hath no fury like a woman denied her paycheck, her right to vote, and control over her own body.

Sheesh. I wasn’t going to go into a political tirade. Maybe I need to let go and just be myself. Yes. That will work. Because there are plenty like me and we vote.

Spring is here, except in North Dakota. The hum of cheering crowds at baseball games become a vapid lullaby for our national sign-carrying distress.

The only respite to the backdrop of war anxiety and talk of chemical weapons is remembering the glow of hope that some super hero can deliver. Scanned scenes of babies brought to you by major news corporations vying for power overwhelms the senses. It’s all too much, it’s all too flipping efficient, like a self- driving car crashing into someone out for an evening stroll. Cut. Oh well. Move on to the next story.

So the past few weeks have whizzed by like a flash of lightning. Some of our dearest relatives came to visit so I put aside current projects for a moment. For whatever it’s worth, dear readers, if you are a diarist or note-taker, be proud. In the age of Instagram and sell-your-private-info-for megabucks social media, a hand written story or messy paragraph on a scratch pad might be a treasure someone will cherish after you are long gone. Heck, your notes might even have historical relevance or be romantic inspirations.

I have mementos that mean more to me than my car. Well, not quite, but almost. I have my grandfather’s treatment plans for his patients, my other grandfather’s post cards to my mother. I have poems I wrote as a five year old. Recipes found tucked inside a library discard book that may have been untouched for years.

 

physician treatment plan for arthritis circa 1922

 

That’s all I have right now.  It’s a diversion from what I’d planned to share but that’s the life of journal-writer.  It’s all beyond my control and as you know, moms and grandmas are often accused of being control freaks. 🙂

Next time I will get to the stories.

Journal prompt: Write whatever is on the top of your head or coming out your ears. Be as dry, sarcastic or as moody as you want.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in women trailblazers, womens history month

Women Who Run with Words

It’s another heavy…

Hey Readers, I have to confess my thoughts and feelings have been numb since the Valentine’s Day tragedy in Florida. I’m angry right along with victims’ families who are opposed to assault weapons.  The news floored me.  A weird panic came over me when I realized that these gruesome events were starting to run together in my mind and I worried that I would forget them, as if I had a duty to to take care of it all, as if I had a responsibility to be of comfort for all the families. I do, we do. This is our world. I stopped writing anything substantial beyond my daily journal, didn’t draw much either. I wept. Taking walks helped the tension but I was still glued to the news. The same old watered down statements  emanated from politicians and news anchors like a bad dream. In the wake of #metoo and #NotOneMore the finality of the event culminated in the devastating photograph of the 7000 pairs of shoes on the Capitol lawn.

March 8th was International Women’s Day and March is Women’s History Month here in the US. I decided to choose quotes by some women who are, or have been, trailblazers. I should have included some comedy but I’m not there yet. How many times can we wring our hands and say we’ve got to do better?

It’s timely that the movie Black Panther  and A Wrinkle in Time have ignited theatres with women and girls in powerful leadership roles. Congratulations!

Below are some of the women among so many, who come to mind when I sat down to write today.

 The first is Sybrina Fulton, who was thrust into leadership role on a national level because of gun violence. Her youngest son, 17-year-old Trayvon Martin, was murdered in 2012 while walking home from a local store. He had not committed a crime. He had gone out to buy  some candy. That’s it. He was a black youth wearing a hoodie at night.

His mother said in 2015 on CNN, “It seems our kids are getting younger and younger, they’re killing them younger and younger. There is no regard anymore for human life. There has to be somewhere where we draw the line and say, ‘Listen, our kids want to grow up, too.'”

Huge debates ignited over race, vigilante mentality and gun ownership.  Women of color and their supporters were horrified, worried about their sons and daughters dying on the streets. We agreed that racism is still a pervasive disease in modern American life.

Ask a mother like Sybrina Fulton (and the mothers of Eric Garner, Michael Brown, Tamir Rice and others)  and she will tell you the raw truth: “I think absolutely my son’s race and the color of his skin had a lot to do with why he was shot and killed, in all of these cases, these victims were unarmed. These victims were African-American. That needs to be our conversation.”
– Sybrina Fulton

Let’s not mince words. You can help by the cause buying their book.

                                            ***************

Here are some other quotes to consider. Do you know who said the following?

“Do the best you can in every task, no matter how unimportant it may seem at the time. No one learns more about a problem than the person at the bottom.”

“The power I exert on the court depends on the power of my arguments, not on my gender.” –  Sandra Day O’Connor, the first female Supreme Court judge.

Here’s another Supreme Court justice, Ruth Bader Ginsburg who just celebrated a birthday.

“It is not women’s liberation, it is women’s and men’s liberation.”

“Anybody who has been discriminated, who comes from a group that’s been discriminated against, knows what it’s like.”

    Louise Nevelson, sculptor
“I only know this – that you can’t give advice to an artist. “

Susan B Anthony  women’s rights activist:

“Men, their rights, and nothing more; women, their rights, and nothing less.

“I distrust those people who know so well what God wants them to do, because I notice it always coincides with their own desires.”

“I declare to you that woman must not depend upon the protection of man, but must be taught to protect herself, and there I take my stand.”

This post wouldn’t be complete without the  introduction Deb Haaland, the first Native American woman to run for Congress.  Get out and vote!

Winona LaDuke, activist:

“The first thing I am is a person. I am a woman. And I am part of a nation, the Indian nation. But people either relate to you as an Indian or as a woman. They relate to you as a category. A lot of people don’t realize that I am not that different from everyone else. “

“Tribes have the potential to provide almost 15 percent of the country’s electricity with wind power, and have 4.5 times the solar resources to power the entire U.S.”

Marjory Stoneman Douglas, namesake of the high school in Florida where the Valentine’s Day killings happened, was an eco-activist and is included in this link. 

 “You have to stand up for some things in this world.” She was a lover of the Everglades and a warrioress for ecological concerns. “You can’t conserve what you don’t have.”

I’m stricken by the irony of her words.

Octavia Spencer, actress:

“You cannot live to please everyone else. You have to edify, educate and fulfill your own dreams and destiny, and hope that whatever your art is that you’re putting out there, if it’s received, great, I respect you for receiving it. If it’s not received, great, I respect you for not.”

While we’re honoring women I want to say a prayer for Brazilian activist, Marielle Franco  killed recently, most likely for her passionate work for human rights. One of her causes was advocating for brightly lit bus stops so that women could be safe at night.

I have to end my tribute with a shout out to on of my favorite artists, Marilyn Church. Check out The Art of Justice, an Eyewitness View of Thirty Infamous Trials. She writes, “sometimes a good drawing can tell more than a photograph-.” I want to draw that well.

There are countless women I admire from cultures that stimulate a desire to learn.  Diversity has been my passion since childhood.

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Coming up: A tribute to Kasturba Gandhi, Mahatma Gandhi’s beloved wife. I’ll be doing an interview with her grandson, Arun. You can find my first interview with him here.

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Journal prompt: 1) write about a woman who inspires you. Pick out a few adjectives to describe her. 2) If you are a woman, write a tribute to yourself. What are the accomplishments that make you most proud?

Discussion: how do you view the role of women in society? Are you traditional or do you relate to feminists? Do you think gender matters when it comes to leadership and power?